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Should reminder sensors in child car seats be compulsory? Italy takes its first steps in this direction by studying the option

Sensores antiolvido en las sillitas de coche, ¿debería ser obligatorio? Italia da el primer paso al estudiar la medida

06/11/2018

Forgetting about a child in the car is one of the greatest fears any child's parents or caregivers can have. Unfortunately, forgetting your child can sometimes end very badly. It does not have to be one of the hottest months of the year for a child to suffer from heatstroke. On days with temperatures a little over 20ºC, the inside of a car can reach 50ºC.  A body temperature above 40°C can be life-threatening.

There are currently a number of different systems on the market designed to prevent children from being unintentionally left alone in the car. Italy is one of the countries hoping to take a step forward in this sense. The Italian Minister of Transport, Danilo Toninelli, recently announced in an interview that it will be compulsory to have a child car seat with a sensor to prevent children from being left alone in vehicles. Italy is unequivocally supporting ways of bringing to an end these incidents arising due to forgetfulness. In the last few years, Italy has had cases of children dying inside cars due to parents forgetting about them. 

Therefore, the Italian Government is looking at putting in place a tax deduction of up to 200 euros per family for the installation of these systems. 

The idea is to set up a sensor to warn the driver that there is a child in the child car seat when the car door is closed. This sensor would detect the child's weight. 

Acting in time can save the lives of many of these children. The ‘Children in cars and heatstroke in infancy' report, from the Spanish Pediatric Association and Fundación MAPFRE, outlines the effects of leaving a child alone in a car and how heatstroke can occur. The report also offers advice on how to prevent it and what to do if your child suffers from heatstroke.

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